Key Biodiversity Areas (KBAs) have the potential to engage people in the conservation and stewardship of special natural areas. Whether sites are remote and hard to access, or situated minutes from an urban core, they have the potential to attract curious nature-lovers and inspire people to action. Join for a two-part mini-series exploring how KBAs could foster conservation engagement among interested volunteers: reviewing the successes and lessons learned from community-based conservation programs, and looking forward to how these models could be replicated across KBAs.

In Part 2 of this mini-series, we explore how we could build from existing multi-taxa models to promote conservation engagement within KBAs. Many areas that will become KBAs already have naturalist groups, passionate individuals, or other organizations who regularly monitor or promote conservation action within them. What lessons can we learn from these groups? And how can we drive conservation engagement in KBAs that are for species not as charismatic as birds, or for sites that don’t have the traditional history of stewardship that other KBAs do? Join to hear presentations and discussion from Mark Stabb of Nature Conservancy of Canada, and Margaret Lidkea and Wylie Thomas of Victoria B.C.’s Friends of Uplands Park Society.